Acetyl-L-Carnitine (ALCAR)

from 8.20 / 90 capsules

Acetyl-L-Carnitine and commonly abbreviated as ALCAR is an acetylated form of the compound L-Carnitine. Unlike L-Carnitine, Acetyl-L-Carnitine can cross the blood-brain barrier.

ALCAR is often used to support brain health due to its ability to cross the blood-brain barrier. Therefore, Acetyl-L-Carnitine is used to boost brain energy and focus, a healthy mood, memory health and more[1].

90 capsules 11.70 11.70 / 90 capsules
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8.20 / 90 capsules

What is Acetyl-L-Carnitine (ALCAR)?

Acetyl-L-Carnitine and commonly abbreviated as ALCAR is an acetylated form of the compound L-Carnitine. ALCAR is a good source of L-Carnitine, a derived from the essential amino acids L-lysine and L-methionine. Carnitine is generally abundant in food products of animal origin, while fruits, vegetables, grains and other plant foods contain relatively small amounts of carnitine. L-Carnitine is best known for its involvement in the mitochondrial oxidation of long chain fatty acids.

Unlike L-Carnitine, Acetyl-L-Carnitine can cross the blood-brain barrier. Once it reaches the brain, it is converted to Acetyl-CoA, which binds with choline already present to become acetylcholine. Acetylcholine is a neurotransmitter closely associated with many important cognitive functions, such as memory formation, reasoning skills, processing of perceptual data, and the ability of neural structures to grow[1]. Acetyl-L-Carnitine is more bioavailable than unacetylated forms of carnitine, which cannot cross the blood-brain barrier.

Properties

There are several forms of L-Carnitine available. Acetyl-L-Carnitine (ALCAR) is used for cognitive enhancement[1]. L-Carnitine L-Tartrate (LCLT) is mostly used for physical performance and power. Glycine Propionyl L-Carnitine (GPLC) is used to relieve intermittent claudication and blood flow problems.

ALCAR is often used to support brain health due to its ability to cross the blood-brain barrier. Therefore, Acetyl-L-Carnitine is used to boost brain energy and focus, a healthy mood, memory health and more[1].

[1] In 2011, the EFSA (European Food Safety Authority) was asked for scientific advice on the substantiation of health claims related to Acetyl-L-Carnitine and neurological support. The EFSA panel notes that no human studies have been submitted from which to draw conclusions to support the scientific claim. Based on the data presented, the EFSA panel concludes that no cause-and-effect relationship has been established between the consumption of Acetyl-L-Carnitine and its contribution to normal cognitive functioning.

External Resources

Next Valley is legally prohibited from making statements about the properties and uses of Acetyl-L-Carnitine (ALCAR) if they have not been approved as a health claim by the European Commission.

For more information, we refer you to external sources.

Dose

The standard dose for L-Carnitine is between 500 and 2000 mg. The equivalent dosage range of L-Carnitine in the form of ALCAR is 630-2500 mg, given in two or three doses. It is best to start with a low dose, for example 250 mg per day, to see how your body reacts to ALCAR. Take Acetyl-L-Carnitine between meals with plenty of water.

Side effects

Mild side effects sometimes occur, especially if the dose taken is too high, or ALCAR is taken together with medications. Effects that may occur include stomach pain, nausea and vomiting. However, these effects are minimal and usually disappear when the dosage is adjusted. In case of insomnia or restlessness, Acetyl-L-Carnitine should not be taken in the evening.

Ingredients

Daily Recommended Dosage: 2 to 10 capsules

Ingredients per 1 capsule

250mg ALCAR (Acetyl-L-Carnitine HCL)

Gelatin capsule
StarCap 1500® (capsule filler)

Instructions for use

Do not use if you are under 18, or if you are pregnant or breastfeeding. Do not use if you have high blood pressure or medical complications. Always consult an expert before using new food supplements. A healthy lifestyle is important, as is a varied and balanced diet for which supplements are no substitute. Do not exceed recommended dosage.

The standard dose for L-Carnitine is between 500 and 2000 mg. The equivalent dose range of L-Carnitine in the form as ALCAR is 630-2500 mg, given in two or three doses. It is best to start with a low dose, for example 250 mg per day, to see how your body reacts to ALCAR. Take Acetyl-L-Carnitine between meals with plenty of water.

Mild side effects sometimes occur, especially if the dose taken is too high, or ALCAR is taken together with medications. Effects that may occur include stomach pain, nausea and vomiting. However, these effects are minimal and usually disappear when the dosage is adjusted. In case of insomnia or restlessness, Acetyl-L-Carnitine should not be taken in the evening.

Keep cool, dry and closed.

Certificate of Analysis

A Certificate of Analysis may sometimes be referred to as a COA, a CofA, a Certificate of Conformity, or a Certificate of Conformity. It is a document certifying that a product delivered meets the specifications of the recipient.

Certificate of Analysis for Acetyl-L-Carnitine (ALCAR)

The content of a Certificate of Analysis varies by industry and product category. Below we discuss the content of a COA that is generally accepted for the raw materials processed in Next Valley products.

What is a Certificate of Analysis?

What is a health claim?

A health claim is any statement about a relationship between nutrition and health.

Next Valley is legally prohibited from making statements about the properties and uses of Acetyl-L-Carnitine (ALCAR) if they have not been approved as a health claim by the European Commission.

The European Commission approves various health claims, provided they are based on scientific evidence and can be easily understood by consumers. The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) is responsible for evaluating the scientific evidence to support health claims.

The scientific evidence is provided by the health claim applicant. These examinations are usually carried out by the applicant or are known at the time of the application. New studies are only included in the evaluation by EFSA if a new application is made.

Claim: Contribution to normal cognitive function
Claim ID: 1432
Year of evaluation: 2011
Source EFSA: j.efsa.2011.2200
EFSA conclusion: no cause-effect relationship
The claimed effect is “neurological support”. The target audience is assumed to be the general population. In the context of the clarifications provided by the Member States, the panel assumes that the claimed effect relates to normal cognitive function. The panel believes that the contribution to normal cognitive functioning is a beneficial physiological effect.

The panel notes that no human studies have been submitted from which to draw conclusions to support the scientific claim.

Based on the data presented, the panel concludes that a cause-and-effect relationship has not been established between the consumption of Acetyl-L-Carnitine and its contribution to normal cognitive functioning.


Claim: L-Carnitine targets the main causes of cellulite
Claim ID: 2843
Source EFSA:
EFSA conclusion: Evaluation health claim is ongoing

Claim: Faster recovery from muscle fatigue after exercise
Claim ID: 738, 1492, 1493
Year of evaluation: 2011
Source EFSA: j.efsa.2011.2212
EFSA conclusion: no cause-effect relationship
The claimed effects are “fat metabolism” and “muscle metabolism / recovery after exercise”. It is assumed that the target group is adults who perform heavy physical exertion. In the context of the proposed formulations, the panel assumes that the claimed effects relate to recovery from muscle fatigue after exercise. The panel believes that faster recovery from muscle fatigue after exercise is a beneficial physiological effect.

No references have been provided from which to draw conclusions for the scientific substantiation of the claim.

Based on the data presented, the panel concludes that there is no cause-and-effect relationship between L-Carnitine consumption and faster recovery from muscle fatigue after exercise.


Claim: Repair of skeletal muscle tissue
Claim ID: 738, 1492, 1493
Year of evaluation: 2011
Source EFSA: j.efsa.2011.2212
EFSA conclusion: no cause-effect relationship
The claimed effects are “fat metabolism” and “muscle metabolism / recovery after exercise”. The target audience is believed to be adults performing resistance training. In the context of the proposed wordingand the panel assumes that the claimed effects relate to the reconstruction of structural protein in skeletal muscle tissue after exercise, causing muscle damage. The panel believes that repair of skeletal muscle tissue has a beneficial physiological effect.

No references have been provided from which to draw conclusions for the scientific substantiation of the claim.

Based on the data presented, the panel concludes that a cause-and-effect relationship has not been established between L-Carnitine consumption and the repair of skeletal muscle tissue.


Claim: Increase in stamina
Claim ID: 4305, 4684
Year of evaluation: 2011
Source EFSA: j.efsa.2011.2212
EFSA conclusion: no cause-effect relationship
The claimed effects are “ergogenic role in sport and exercise”, and “fat metabolism by mediating the transport of long-chain fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane”. The target audience is assumed to be adults who exercise endurance. In the context of the proposed formulations, the panel assumes that the claimed effects refer to an increase in endurance capacity by promoting fat oxidation. The panel believes that an increase in endurance is a beneficial physiological effect.

No references have been provided from which to draw conclusions for the scientific substantiation of the claim.

Based on the data presented, the panel concludes that a cause-and-effect relationship has not been established between L-Carnitine consumption and endurance gain.


Claim: Maintaining normal blood LDL cholesterol levels
Claim ID: 4305, 4684
Source EFSA: j.efsa.2011.2212
EFSA conclusion: no cause-effect relationship
The claimed effects are “heart health” and “fat metabolism by mediating the transport of long-chain fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane”. The target audience is assumed to be the general population. In the context of the proposed formulations, the panel assumes that the claimed effects relate to the maintenance of normal LDL cholesterol concentrations in the blood. The panel is of the opinion that maintenance of normal blood LDL cholesterol concentrations is a beneficial physiological effect.

In weighing the evidence, the panel took into account that the provided human intervention studies showed no sustained effect of L-carnitine consumption on blood cholesterol levels, that results from studies in rats and rabbits cannot be extrapolated to humans. due to large differences in lipid metabolism between species, and that no evidence has been provided for a mechanism by which L-Carnitine could exert its claimed effect in humans.

Based on the data presented, the panel concludes that a cause-and-effect relationship has not been established between the consumption of L-Carnitine and the maintenance of normal LDL cholesterol concentrations in the blood.


Claim: Contribution to normal spermatogenesis
Claim ID: 1822
Year of evaluation: 2011
Source EFSA: j.efsa.2011.2212
EFSA conclusion: no cause-effect relationship
The claimed effect is “genital organs, hormone activity”. The target audience is assumed to be the general male population. In the context of the proposed formulations, the panel assumes that the claimed effect refers to a contribution to normal spermatogenesis. The panel is of the opinion that the contribution to normal spermatogenesis is a beneficial physiological effect.

No human studies have been submitted from which conclusions can be drawn for the scientific substantiation of the claim.

Based on the presented dataens the panel concludes that no cause-and-effect relationship has been established between the consumption of L-Carnitine and the contribution to normal spermatogenesis.


Claim: “Energy Metabolism”
Claim ID: 1821
Year of evaluation: 2011
Source EFSA: j.efsa.2011.2212
EFSA conclusion: claimed effect general and non-specific
The claimed effect is “energy metabolism”. The target audience is assumed to be the general population.

The panel is of the opinion that the claimed effect is general and non-specific and does not refer to a specific health claim as required by Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006.


Claim: Increasing L-Carnitine concentrations and/or decreasing free fatty acids in the blood during pregnancy
Claim ID: 1495
Year of evaluation: 2011
Source EFSA: j.efsa.2011.2212
EFSA conclusion: no cause-effect relationship
The claimed effect is “pregnancy”. The target audience is believed to be pregnant women. In the context of the proposed formulations, the panel assumes that the claimed effect is related to increasing L-carnitine concentrations and decreasing free fatty acids in the blood during pregnancy. The panel is of the opinion that the evidence provided does not demonstrate that increasing L-carnitine concentrations and/or decreasing free fatty acids in the blood during pregnancy in the context of a high protein diet is in itself a beneficial physiological effect.

Based on the data presented, the panel concludes that a cause-and-effect relationship has not been established between L-Carnitine consumption and a beneficial physiological effect related to increasing L-carnitine concentrations and/or decreases in blood free fatty acids during pregnancy.


Claim: Contribution to maintaining or achieving normal body weight
Claim ID: 4709
Year of evaluation: 2011
Source EFSA: j.efsa.2011.2246
EFSA conclusion: no cause-effect relationship
No relevant human studies examining the effects of L-Carnitine on changes in body weight have been provided with respect to any of the claims evaluated in this section.

A number of animal studies investigating the effects of L-Carnitine on body weight, and a number of animal studies and in vitro studies investigating the mechanisms by which L-Carnitine could exert its claimed effect were also provided. The panel is of the opinion that the evidence provided in animal and in vitro studies is not sufficient to predict the occurrence of an effect of L-Carnitine consumption on human body weight in vivo.

The panel concludes that a cause-and-effect relationship has not been established between the consumption of L-Carnitine that is the subject of the claims evaluated in this section and its contribution to the maintenance or achievement of normal body weight.


Claim: Increase in endurance during the subsequent training period after strenuous exercise
Claim ID: 1438
Year of evaluation: 2011
Source EFSA: j.efsa.2011.2247
EFSA conclusion: no cause-effect relationship
The references provided in connection with these claims included narrative reviews or studies that addressed the effects of food(s)/food ingredient(s) other than the food ingredient(s) or specificspecific combination of food components to which the claims relate and/or studied health outcomes (e.g. gastric emptying rate, blood glucose concentration, serum insulin concentration) unrelated to the claimed effect. The references also include a study on the specific combination of the nutritional components that is the subject of the health outcome claim (eg, muscle glycogen stores), other than endurance. The panel is of the opinion that no conclusions can be drawn from these references for the scientific substantiation of the claims.

No human studies have been provided examining the effects of L-Carnitine on an increase in endurance during subsequent exercise after strenuous exercise with respect to any of the claims evaluated herein. section.

The panel concludes that a cause-and-effect relationship has not been established between L-Carnitine consumption and an increase in endurance performance during the subsequent training period after strenuous exercise.