5-HTP

from 15.60 / 90 capsules

5-HTP is also called 5-hydroxytryptophan. It is a derivative, or derivative, of the substance tryptophan. This is an amino acid that is mainly found in protein-rich foods. You can find a lot of tryptophan in eggs, beef, chicken, fish and dairy. In addition, the seeds of Griffonia simplicifolia also contain a lot of tryptophan and 5-HTP. This nootropic is an intermediate in the production of serotonin and melatonin from tryptophan.

90 capsules 22.30 22.30 / 90 capsules
180 capsules 37.90
15% bulk discount
18.95 / 90 capsules
270 capsules 46.80
30% bulk discount
15.60 / 90 capsules

What is 5-HTP?

5-HTP is also called 5-hydroxytryptophan. It is a derivative, or derivative, of the substance tryptophan. This is an amino acid that is mainly found in protein-rich foods. You can find a lot of tryptophan in eggs, beef, chicken, fish and dairy. In addition, the seeds of Griffonia Simplicifolia also contain a lot of tryptophan and 5-HTP.

Properties

The amino acid 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) acts as an antioxidant and is the direct precursor of serotonin and melatonin. Serotonin is an important neurotransmitter in the brain for the regulation of mood, behavior and sexuality and a normal appetite.

External Resources

Next Valley is legally prohibited from making statements about the properties and uses of 5-HTP (Griffonia Extract) if they have not been approved as a health claim by the European Commission.

For more information, we refer you to external sources.

Dose

The recommended daily amount for adults is 100 mg per day. It is important to start with a low dose on first use. This allows you to test your tolerance for 5-HTP. When used excessively, side effects may occur.

Side effects

There are a number of known side effects of 5-HTP. However, these only occur if you use a dosage that is too high for you or if you completely exceed the daily recommended amount. There is some evidence that long-term use of 5-HTP is not good for you. Occasional side effects include nausea, diarrhea and nightmares. You have the least chance of side effects when you take 5-HTP with food so that it is digested slowly. Some medicines or drugs combine poorly with 5-HTP. If you are taking medication, talk to your doctor about whether it is safe for you to use 5-HTP and at what dosage. Prevention is always better than cure!

Ingredients

Daily Recommended Dosage: 1 capsule

Ingredients per 1 capsule

100mg 5-HTP (Griffonia simplicifolia seed extract)

Gelatin capsule
StarCap 1500® (capsule filler)

Instructions for use

Do not use if you are under 18, or if you are pregnant or breastfeeding. Do not use if you have high blood pressure or medical complications. Always consult an expert before using new food supplements. A healthy lifestyle is important, as is a varied and balanced diet for which supplements are no substitute. Do not exceed recommended dosage.

Recommended dosage: As a dietary supplement for adults, 1 capsule.

Keep cool, dry and closed.

Certificate of Analysis

A Certificate of Analysis may sometimes be referred to as a COA, a CofA, a Certificate of Conformity, or a Certificate of Conformity. It is a document certifying that a product delivered meets the specifications of the recipient.

Certificate of Analysis for 5-HTP

The content of a Certificate of Analysis varies by industry and product category. Below we discuss the content of a COA that is generally accepted for the raw materials processed in Next Valley products.

What is a Certificate of Analysis?

What is a health claim?

A health claim is any statement about a relationship between nutrition and health.

Next Valley is legally prohibited from making statements about the properties and uses of 5-HTP (Griffonia Extract) if they have not been approved as a health claim by the European Commission.

The European Commission approves various health claims, provided they are based on scientific evidence and can be easily understood by consumers. The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) is responsible for evaluating the scientific evidence to support health claims.

The scientific evidence is provided by the health claim applicant. These examinations are usually carried out by the applicant or are known at the time of the application. New studies are only included in the evaluation by EFSA if a new application is made.

Claim: Mood improvement
Claim ID: 1575
Year of evaluation: 2009
Source EFSA: j.efsa.2009.1273
EFSA conclusion: no cause-effect relationship
The claimed effect is “mood enhancement”. The panel believes that improving mood can be beneficial for human health.

The panel notes that the evidence provided does not demonstrate that clinically depressed patients are representative of the general population with regard to mood improvement, or that results obtained in studies of clinically depressed subjects can be extrapolated to mood improvement in the general population.

Based on the available evidence, the panel concludes that a cause-and-effect relationship has not been established between dietary 5-HTP intake and mood improvement.


Claim: Attention
Claim ID: 1828
Year of evaluation: 2009
Source EFSA: j.efsa.2009.1273
EFSA conclusion: no cause-effect relationship
The claimed effect is “mental state and performance”. In the context of the proposed wording, the panel assumes that the claimed effects relate to concentration and reduction of restlessness. The panel believes that regular attention can benefit human health.

The panel believes that the evidence provided does not demonstrate that clinically ill patients with anxiety, panic and sleep disorders are representative of the general population with regard to normal attention, or that results obtained in studies of subjects with anxiety, panic – and sleep disturbances can be extrapolated to normal attention in the general population.

Based on the available data, the panel concludes that a cause-and-effect relationship has not been established between dietary intake of 5-HTP and normal attention.


Claim: Increase in satiety leading to a reduction in energy intake
Claim ID: 4223
Year of evaluation: 2011
Source EFSA: j.efsa.2011.2198
EFSA conclusion: no cause-effect relationship
The claimed effect is “saturation”. The target audience is assumed to be the general population. The panel believes that an increase in satiety leading to a reduction in energy intake, if sustained, may have a beneficial physiological effect.

No references have been provided from which to draw conclusions for the scientific substantiation of the claim.

Based on the data presented, the panel concludes that a cause-and-effect relationship has not been established between 5-hydroxytryptophan consumption and a sustained increase in satiety leading to a reduction in energy intake.